Eggs, larvae Pupa and the adult- this amazing metamorphosis goes on every day without us. See some of the pictures below of "who"is growing at Flying Flowers.

Plants - host and nectar and what that means? see the list below.

Do I have to let the caterpillar eat my plants? yes if you ever want Butterflies!

How can I have butterflies in my yard? Plant items from the lists below and come to a class at Flying Flowers of Beagle Ridge.

Here are pictures of Monarch eggs in the flowers and on the leaves of tropical Milkweed. One female lay these eggs in less than two hours. Visitors sat and watched as she would lay one, fly around and come back and lay another one.

MONARCH EGGS ON TROPICAL MILKWEED FLOWERS
EGGS ON MILKWEED

If you look in the background you can see eggs on the seedpod of the milkweed. The Larvae will eat their eggshell first and then start on whatever part of the plant they were laid on.

In the picture below we have a Monarch as she lays her eggs. Unfortunately the date was Oct 13th, way after the release and this was way too late for them to make it.

ADULT MONARCH LAYING EGGS ON MILKWEED

This is a Tulip Popular Tree which was still in a pot ( I hadn't had a chance to get it in the ground before a Tiger Swallowtail laid her eggs ). 

TIGER SWALLOWTAIL EGGS ON tULIP POPULAR

 The following shots are of the Spicebush Swallowtail eggs.  Notice how the leaves are cut and curled. Once the larval hatch, they cut and roll the leaves around themselves to protect themselves.  

SPICEBUSH SWALLOWTAIL EGGS ON SPICEBUSH

These next shots are of Spicebush Swallowtail Larvae. They are so ugly they are cute. 

TWO SPICEBUSH SWALLOWTAIL CSTERPILLARS

Notice they are two different sizes?  The top one is a 2nd. Instar the bottom a 3rd. Instar. Each time they molt they will change a bit and get larger. Spicebush Swallowtails change dramatically- go below to see a 4th Instar and then see the changes before they become a pupa.

4TH INSTAR OF A SPICEBUSH SWALLOWTAIL CATERPILLAR

Yes this is a Spicebush Swallowtail. He becomes green to camouflage but the eye spots will scare away predators. Those are not eyes! His eyes are actually down in the beige part by his mouth. Nature is wonderful!

CLOSEUP OF 4TH INSTAR

Notice the color changes, the peachy colored one is getting ready to pupate.

SPICEBUSH CATS ONE READY TO PUPATE

 Butterflies and their required Host Plants

From  A Regional Guide to Butterfly Gardening in zone 6


The following is a list of Butterflies and what their larvae eat- remember as a caterpillar they only eat, as an adult butterfly they drink.   These wonderful insects will eat the Host plants as a caterpillar  and as such if there is something you want to use such as Parsley, plant extra for them and be sure to share. 

So in order to make your yard a habitat for Butterflies you will need plants for all the stages of their life. 


Butterflies and their required Host Plants

From  A Regional Guide to Butterfly Gardening in our area

Region 6
Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia

      • Black Swallowtail
        (
        Papilio polyxenes)

          • Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

          • Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

          • Carrot (Daucus carota)

          • Dill (Anethum graveolens)
             

      • Spicebush Swallowtail
        (
        Papilio troilus)

          • Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)

          • Sassafrass (Sassafrass albidum)
             

      • Tiger Swallowtail
        (
        Papilio glaucus)

          • Wild Cherry (Prunus spp.)

          • Poplar (Populus spp.)
             

      • Pipevine Swallowtail
        (
        Battus philenor)

          • Pipevines (Aristolochia spp.)
             

      • Buckeye
        (
        Junonia coenia)

          • Snapdragon (Antirrhinum spp.)

          • Verbena (Verbenaceae)
             

      • Pearl Crescent
        (
        Phyciodes tharos)

          • Asters (Asteraceae)
             

      • Monarch
        (
        Danaus plexippus)

          • Milkweed (Asclepias spp.)
             

      • Cloudless Sulphur
        (
        Phoebis sennae)

          • Wild Senna (Cassia spp.)
             

      • Gulf Fritillary
        (
        Dione vanillae)

          • Passion Vine (Passiflora spp.)
             

      • Red-spotted Purple
        (
        Limenitis astyanax)

          • Willow (Salix spp.)

          • Wild Cherry(Prunus spp.)

FLOWERS (Nectar Sources)
The following are excellent sources of nectar for your Butterfly Garden and can be purchased at many retail nurseries and garden centers throughout the country. Plant these in abundance where regionally available. Although many of these are annuals at the farm they are worth planting as nectar producers. The items in
Red are usually available at Flying Flowers, items in Blue should be started from seed.


  • Buddleia

  • Heliotrope

  • Lantana

  • Milkweed

  • Mint                              

  • Pentas

  • Porterweed

  • Verbena

  • Zinnias